Get The Most Out Of Your Lawn With These Planting & Care Instructions

Start Out Right - The Grassology Low Maintenance Lawn Care Program.
Do Less, Get More

Initial Assessment of the growing conditions (amount of light, soil type, surface drainage, etc.) is vital, followed by selection of the appropriate grass species to meet quality and use requirements. For example, selecting an ORDINARY Kentucky Bluegrass will provide a high quality lawn, only if it is cared for with regular water and fertilizer. If you'd like to mow less, not water, and fertilize only once a year, Grassology is your best option.

If you have an existing lawn and would like to convert to a Grassology lawn, consider seeding in the existing lawn with Grassology. Start out by taking a soil sample and sending it to a county extension office for testing. This will give an indication of the amount of fertilizer needed to supply the plants with the necessary nutrition. The keys to establishing grass from seed are proper soil preparation, selecting the right grass, ensuring intimate soil to seed contact with a light roller, keeping the seed bed moist, then commence mowing when the lawn achieves the height at which it will be maintained.


When To Plant Zone Map -
Spring is a great time to plant!

Zone Best Time For Planting a
NEW Grassology Lawn
Best Time To Overseed ANY Lawn
1 Spring Or Fall Any Time Temperatures Are Between 60-80° F
2 Spring Or Fall Any Time Temperatures Are Between 60-80° F
3 Spring Or Fall Any Time Temperatures Are Between 60-80° F
4 Use Grassology For Overseeding ONLY Late Fall When Existing Lawn Begins To Brown

How Much Seed To Plant

Coverage Planting A
NEW Grassology Lawn
Overseeding A
STANDARD Lawn
Overseeding A
Grassology Lawn
  500 Sq/ft  3 lbs.  3 lbs.  2 lbs.
1,000 Sq/ft  6 lbs.  6 lbs.  4 lbs.
1,500 Sq/ft  9 lbs.  9 lbs.  6 lbs.
2,000 Sq/ft 12 lbs. 12 lbs.  8 lbs.
2,500 Sq/ft 15 lbs. 15 lbs. 10 lbs.
3,000 Sq/ft 18 lbs. 18 lbs. 12 lbs.
3,500 Sq/ft 21 lbs. 21 lbs. 14 lbs.
4,000 Sq/ft 24 lbs. 24 lbs. 16 lbs.
4,500 Sq/ft 27 lbs. 27 lbs. 18 lbs.
5,000 Sq/ft 30 lbs. 30 lbs. 20 lbs.

Overseeding Existing Lawns

  1. Mow your existing lawn as short as possible and remove all grass clippings.
  2. Spread the Grassology seed at recommended coverage rate shown above. Broadcast seeds uniformly over the area using a drop or rotary spreader. Beware that excessive seeding creates too much competition between the seedlings, so resist the temptation to apply the seed heavily. Seeding at the correct rate encourages optimal growth.
  3. Rake Using very light pressure, rake the seed into the top ⅛ to ¼ inch of soil. While some seed may remain visible, it will still germinate better than if it is buried too deeply.
  4. Keep soil moist for first 30 days then slowly cut back on watering. Do not allow soil to become too wet or too dry.

Establishing Your NEW Grassology Lawn

  1. Remove existing vegetation. If there is existing weedy vegetation on the site, especially of the type with persistent stems or root systems, it will need to be removed. If this step is skipped, these weeds (such as quackgrass or ground ivy) will most likely appear in the new Grassology lawn. Removal is best accomplished by using a broad-spectrum herbicide (such as glyphosate). If only annual weeds are on the site, then this step can be safely skipped.
  2. Modify the soil and establish a rough grade. If the native soil is extremely rocky, droughty, compacted or poorly drained, you may wish to make modifications, such as installing underground drainage or irrigation lines. For soils that are either very sandy or high in clay, adding four to six inches of loam, and/or rototilling four to six inches of high quality compost into the soil, will be beneficial. This is the only opportunity you have to modify the soil, so take advantage of it. Be sure to eliminate low spots, large rocks, roots, etc..
  3. Have your soil tested. The only way you can know what amendments are needed is to send a sample of soil to a laboratory for pH and nutrient analysis. Due to certain states laws that restricts the use of phosphorous on lawns, it is important to determine if the soil needs additional phosphorous, because it is most easily added during the establishment process. Getting a soil sample tested by a lab may take a few weeks, so it is best done after soil modifications have been made, but well before you plan on planting the seed. Your local Cooperative Extension Service can test soil for pH in-house for a modest fee, and can help you send your soil off to a lab for a nutrient analysis.
  4. Apply lime or sulfur. Based on the results of the pH test, use these products as directed and rototill them into the top six inches of soil.
  5. Firm the soil surface. First, rake and remove any debris. Then lightly roll the surface, water (if necessary).
  6. Apply fertilizer. Based on the results of your soil test report, follow the recommendations for applying fertilizer. If you didn't have your soil tested, you should apply a "turfgrass starter fertilizer," this is a specialty product sold under this general name or similar, at the rate recommended on the label. Rake the fertilizer into the top few inches of soil.
  7. Spread the Grassology seed at recommended coverage rate shown above. Broadcast seeds uniformly over the area using a drop or rotary spreader. Beware that excessive seeding creates too much competition between the seedlings, so resist the temptation to apply the seed heavily. Seeding at the correct rate encourages optimal growth.
  8. Rake Using very light pressure, rake the seed into the top ⅛ to ¼ inch of soil. While some seed may remain visible, it will still germinate better than if it is buried too deeply.
  9. Roll and water. Lightly roll the area to establish good seed-to-soil contact, but avoid causing more soil compaction. Keep the soil surface moist to prevent the seeds from drying out. This often requires light (five to ten minutes), frequent (twice daily) watering for two to three weeks after seeding. Gradually reduce the water after your Grassology seedlings have emerged to encourage deeper rooting. Once grass covers approximately 60 percent of the ground, the surface can be allowed to dry to a greater degree between waterings.
  10. Fertilize. Three weeks after your Grassology seedlings have emerged, apply a lawn fertilizer at a rate of 1 lb. of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet. This will increase shoot density and improve the seedling's ability to withstand diseases.
  11. Mow your new Grassology lawn. Once more than 60% of your Grassology grass reaches at least two to three inches, start mowing. Mowing encourages lateral shoot development, increases stand density, and helps the turf out-compete the weeds. Make sure your mower blade is sharp. Dull blades can tear young seedlings from the soil.

Caring For Your Grassology Lawn - Easy To Remember. Mow high. Fertilize in Fall. Less water.

The guiding principle governing the primary care of your Grassology lawn is that all cultural practices encourage a deep and extensive root system. The deeper and more extensive the root system, the more efficient the plant will be in mining water and nutrients from the soil, which in turn will require less maintenance in the future.


Your Grassology Lawn Requires Less Mowing

The key to reducing mowing is to mow high. Studies have shown that the higher the leaves are permitted to grow, the deeper the roots. Mowing high means setting the mower to at least 3 inches. This will also shade the soil surface, keeping it cooler and virtually eliminating many weeds such as crabgrass and dandelion. The reduced mowing requirement is realized by following one necessary rule. To maintain healthy plants, you must NEVER remove more than one third of the leaf blade with each mowing. For example, if an ORDINARY lawn is kept at 1 inch, when it grows to 1½ inches it must be mowed. Studies show that on average this will take between 2 and 4 days. On the contrary, if a Grassology lawn is kept at 3 inches, it will require mowing when it reaches 4½ inches. Again, studies have proven that on average, this will take 12 to 15 days. Simply by keeping your lawn's mowed height higher, it will grow a deeper root system, prevent weeds from invading, and require less mowing.

After mowing your Grassology lawn, allow the clippings to remain on the lawn, or simply put, "Don't bag it!". The clippings are filled with valuable nutrients that can be recycled by leaving them on the lawn. It is important to avoid dispersing your clippings onto paved areas where they can be transported to surface water bodies and contribute to phosphorus loading problems. Of course by eliminating bagging, you've just saved more time, kept clippings out of landfills (banned in most states), and recycled vital nutrients back into your lawn.

Your Grassology Lawn Requires Less Feeding

Feeding a Grassology lawn is based on the simple principle that timing is everything! The focus of a Grassology lawn fertilizer program should be from Labor Day to Halloween in ZONES 1-3 (see zone map above). This simple fact challenges many of the commercial myths about fertilizing in the spring. Furthermore, a spring based fertilizer program often leaves ORDINARY lawns less able to tolerate stress from summer drought, traffic, and weed infestations.

Research indicates that cool season grasses produce 60% of all their leaf growth in the first 6 weeks in the spring. The remaining 40% is produced over the next 20 or so weeks of the growing season. The significance of this fact is two fold. For starters, fertilizer applied during the flush of leaf growth in the spring, promotes unnecessary leaf growth that subsequently requires more frequent mowing. Secondly, grasses will produce leaf growth at the expense of root growth. This will result in plants with a shallow root system heading into the typically hot, dry summer months causing the lawn to thin out and allow for weeds to invade.

Feeding a Grassology lawn in the fall months allows the nutrition to be used for root growth, primarily as a result of the reduced leaf growth that normally occurs in the relatively long, cool days of fall.

Your Grassology Lawn Requires Less Watering

The key factor to Grassology's Low Maintenance Lawn Care Program is based on the grasses selected for Grassology. These grasses have naturally occurring properties that impart increased drought tolerance. Grassology lawns kept at 3" or above, will have a healthier root system and are better able to survive sustained dry periods.

Your Grassology Lawn Is Weed Resistant

Grassology contains specific, naturally occurring Plant Incorporated Compounds that provide weed control. Therefore, properly established and maintained Grassology grass will have a natural resistance to weeds.